Self-Helpapedia

Powerful techniques to optimize your emotions, beliefs, and behaviors

The Pattern Tree

The Pattern Tree is a method to alter stuck and self-defeating behavioral patterns. In this process our awareness is brought to how we perform a behavior and to the beliefs, feelings, sensations, urges, and intentions involved in each segment of the behavior pattern. The Behavior Tree is a map of our activity and the internal processes that go on before and during a behavior pattern. Change is brought about by integrating the beliefs, feelings, sensations, and urges involved, by altering intentions, and by altering or halting the physical behavior.

Warning: Folks with a history of mental illness, PTSD, or panic are urged not to use these techniques without a therapist. If you decide to do these processes you will agree to absolve the webmaster, the webhost, Emoclear.com, and Steve Mensing of any responsibility for the application or misapplication of these processes. There is always in any process the possibility that someone could experience some discomfort.

Steps to the Pattern Tree

1. Bring awareness to all segments of a behavioral pattern:  Review your chosen behavior from start to finish. Notice the behavior's different parts or segments. When you are finished go immediately to step 2.

2. In either your imagination or in real life perform a behavioral pattern which you prefer to alter: Either in your imagination or in real life perform a behavioral pattern from start to finish which you prefer to alter. In the first run through just observe what is happening. In a second run through jot down any beliefs, feelings, intentions, sensations, or urges that you have during the behavior. Run the behavior a third time to notice any beliefs, feelings, intentions, sensations, or urges that you might have missed. Also notice any unusual or specific behavioral segments that appear in behavioral run through.

3. Choose 3 internal elements within the behavioral pattern which you would prefer to integrate: Choose 3 internal elements within the behavioral pattern which you would prefer to integrate. These would be beliefs, feelings, intentions, sensations, or urges. Choose 3 from the 5 categories. When you have integrated these three internal elements, then proceed to step 4.

4. Alter the behavioral pattern by choosing to do 2 of the following changes: Alter the behavioral pattern by choosing to do 2 of the following changes:

Change the behavioral pattern's rate of frequency--Chose from not occurring at all to several times a day.

Change the location of the behavioral pattern. Move it somewhere else.

Interrupt or halt any or all of the segments within the behavioral pattern.

Subtract or add segments to the behavioral pattern.

Speed up or slow down the behavioral pattern's duration.

Perform the behavioral pattern without its problematic elements.

5. Would you either drop the behavioral pattern entirely or go with your newly altered version: Would you either drop the behavioral pattern entirely or go with your modified version? If you made a choice to drop the behavioral pattern, then integrate it with an integrator or the Emo Reviewer. If you wish to use a revised version of the behavior, then practice this revised version in your imagination or in real life until it feels natural and becomes a habit. Before you use the revised version, review whether it fits where you are employing it. Do ecology check, as seen below. Make any further changes required. You have not finished installing the behavior until it feels natural and becomes habitual. Using an integrator can help with overcoming feelings of unnaturalness.

Ecology check of a new behavior:

Ask yourself questions like these:



Is this behavior something you want?
Does it improve your life or ability to perform?
Does it fit with your short-term and long-term goals?
Does it keep you out of significant conflict with others? (Unless the conflict is something you prefer).
Does it affect either your physical or mental health?
Could another behavior work better for you?
Will this behavior affect your other behaviors adversely?
Is it right for the context where it's employed?
Does it fit with your values?
Are there future consequences for this behavior?
What might make it difficult to perform in some instances?
How will this impact on your relationships?



Have fun, Steve

 

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